About schalifax

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So far schalifax has created 285 blog entries.

Sister Winifred Cunniff (Anne Mark)

Sister Winifred entered the Sisters of Charity, Halifax in 1957 and was missioned to New York where she began her ministry as an elementary school teacher at Saint Sylvester School in Brooklyn. Following this assignment, she served as teacher and vice principal at Seton Hall High School in Patchogue, NY. Sister Winifred subsequently moved into parish ministry, in Saint Barnabas Parish, Bellmore, NY; Our Lady Queen of Martyrs Parish, Forest Hills, NY; Saint Mary Magdalene Parish, Springfield Gardens, NY; Saint Laurence Parish, Brooklyn, NY; Saint Gabriel Parish, East Elmhurst, NY and Our Lady of Loretto Parish, Hempstead, NY serving at different times, as the Director of Religious Education, Pastoral Associate and Retreat Director.

2022-05-13T13:07:24+00:00By |0 Comments

Assembly 2022

There was excitement in the air. The preparations were done. The cloud technology held the livestreaming capacity ready. The sending off of the Halifax bus, carpools from Wellesley, various New York Toyotas wending their way up Route 95 to Boston, short trips, long air flights, all culminating in hugs and cheers, and a sigh of relief. We were finally together again.

2022-04-28T22:57:12+00:00By |Comments Off on Assembly 2022

Book Review: Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents

As the cover of Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents states: this book is a beautifully written, original, revealing story of people and history, in which Isabelle Wilkerson examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America. She links the caste systems of America, India and Nazi Germany. The book was an eye-opener.

2022-04-28T00:53:02+00:00By |Comments Off on Book Review: Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents

From the Archives — Auntie and the Orphan: The Story of Sisters Maria Felicitas Gee and Elizabeth Seton Belwood

I’m always fascinated by the early Sisters and their lives in community before 1900. How did women find out about the Sisters of Charity, a relatively new and growing congregation? As I looked more into the history of Sister Maria Felicitas, I was surprised to find the touching story of how two Anglican British-born women ended up as Sisters of Charity-Halifax.

2022-04-28T01:01:38+00:00By |Comments Off on From the Archives — Auntie and the Orphan: The Story of Sisters Maria Felicitas Gee and Elizabeth Seton Belwood

Sister Natalie Morris (Annina Marie)

Sister Natalie entered the Sisters of Charity, Halifax in 1951 and was missioned to New York where she began her ministry as a elementary school teacher. In 1973, she took a position as a House Parent in a New York State youth hostel. In 1974 she and her close friend, Sister Patricia Tobin, SC, established Conklin Residence and together were House Parents for exceptional young adults. Sister Natalie ministered in New York until moving to Marillac Residence, Wellesley, MA in 2016.

2022-04-26T17:11:07+00:00By |0 Comments

Sister Maureen Harris (Margaret Dennis)

Sister Maureen's ministry as a Sister of Charity began as a teacher and then as a guidance counselor in several parish schools in Bellmore, Brooklyn, Rego Park and Patchogue, New York. On returning to Boston, she served as a teacher and guidance counselor at Saint Patrick High School in Roxbury. Later, Sister Maureen took on a new ministry at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Boston, Jamaica Plain and West Roxbury, MA as an Education Specialist before retiring to Elizabeth Seton Residence.

2022-03-18T01:30:17+00:00By |0 Comments

Sister Ann Regan (James Mary)

Sister Ann's desire to serve the poor and disenfranchised found her missioned to Saint Peter Parish, Lowell, MA, Saint Kevin and Saint Peter Parishes in Dorchester, MA. Sister Ann also served as a member of the Community Leadership Team at Mount Saint Vincent, Wellesley, MA, and as a Congregational Councilor on the Congregational Leadership Team.

2022-03-06T21:36:12+00:00By |3 Comments
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